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September 5, 2013
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Aztec Postclassic Woman in Black Paint by Kamazotz Aztec Postclassic Woman in Black Paint by Kamazotz
This image is based on a rare depiction of an Aztec person wearing paint. Aside from the yellow-paint women used and the occasional black coloring Priests used on their skin, most Aztecs did not wear paint or tattoos, they usually differentiated themselves from 'others' by their use of body paint. Even in war, there is still on-going debate as to whether Aztecs used paint in battle. Certainly it was used during war rituals (but this was also used during non-military rituals as well). The question remains controversial.

The image comes from the Codex Borbonicus. The woman holds a bowl carrying pulque. The skirt is red with nopal drawings weaved in. The skirt is also fringed at the hem. I am uncertain what the design on her huipil is supposed to be.
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:iconsarkananight:
Sarkananight Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Though hair-colour-oil was used heavily, the Aztecs prefered natural beauty, so this is sure a rare sight. ;)
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:iconkamazotz:
Kamazotz Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2013  Professional General Artist
I remember reading somewhere that some noble women were beginning to adapt foreign types of aesthetics. Sahagun mentions palace girls painting their lips, hands, neck and chest. Aside from rituals, face and body makeup did not seem to be common, but it could be that it was part of a trend (just not looked upon well by other people in the society maybe). But, the palace noblewomen who did paint themselves were refereed to in a very esteemed way, even though harlots also dressed this way and they're called shallow and filthy women because of this. It's a confusing double standard.
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:iconsarkananight:
Sarkananight Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It could be a short period when the court fashion changed and this got a trend as you mentioned... I have certainly never heard of it. Did Sahagun mention a specific year or was it around the time of the conquest?
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:iconkamazotz:
Kamazotz Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2013  Professional General Artist
I think it may have been just before the conquest. I honestly don't remember in which book I read it (it may be from the Florentine Codex). It's not unlikely considering Tenochtitlan was huge and had contact with many different people that regularly visited the city.
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:iconsarkananight:
Sarkananight Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Ahh yeah, that makes it even more possible.
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:iconsir-aedan-mccromlech:
Sir-Aedan-McCromlech Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
He visto esa imagen en un códice. Hermosa representación. Es religiosa verdad?
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:iconkamazotz:
Kamazotz Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2013  Professional General Artist
En verdad no lo se. Ademas, hay que recordar que todo en el mundo para los Aztecas fue cuestion de religion o lo sagrado.
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:iconsir-aedan-mccromlech:
Sir-Aedan-McCromlech Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
creo que tiene qver con el sacerdocio ya que usa los colores
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